Difference between pages "Behavioral Architecture (glossary)" and "Decision Gate (glossary)"

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m (Text replacement - "<center>'''SEBoK v. 2.0, released 1 June 2019'''</center>" to "<center>'''SEBoK v. 2.1, released 31 October 2019'''</center>")
 
m (Text replacement - "<center>'''SEBoK v. 2.0, released 1 June 2019'''</center>" to "<center>'''SEBoK v. 2.1, released 31 October 2019'''</center>")
 
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<blockquote> (1) ''An arrangement of functions and their sub-functions and interfaces (internal and external) which defines the execution sequencing, conditions for control or data-flow and the performance requirements to satisfy the requirements baseline.'' (ISO/IEC 2010) </blockquote>
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<blockquote>''(1) A decision gate is an approval event (often associated with a review meeting). Entry and Exit criteria are established for each decision gate; continuation beyond the decision gate is contingent on the agreement of the decision-makers.'' (INCOSE 2011 p 362)</blockquote>
  
<blockquote> (2) ''A set of inter-related scenarios.'' (Created for SEBoK)</blockquote>
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<blockquote>''(2) A preplanned management event in the project cycle to demonstrate accomplishments, approve and baseline results, and approve the approach for continuing the project. (Also known as a control gate.)'' (Forsberg 2005, p 428)</blockquote>
  
 
===Sources===
 
===Sources===
(1) ISO/IEC. 2010. Systems and Software Engineering, Part 1: Guide for Life Cycle Management. Geneva, Switzerland: International Organization for Standardization (ISO)/International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), ISO/IEC 24748-1:2010.
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(1) INCOSE. 2011. [[INCOSE Systems Engineering Handbook|Systems Engineering Handbook]], version 3.2.2. INCOSE-TP-2003-002-03.2.2.
  
(2) This definition was developed for the SEBoK.
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(2) Forsberg, K., H. Mooz, H. Cotterman. 2005. [[Visualizing Project Management]], 3rd Ed., Hoboken, NJ, USA: John Wiley and Sons.
  
 
===Discussion===
 
===Discussion===
Within the terms and definitions related to System Architecture, the present SEBoK tries to fit the real practices and to provide some consistency between those terms.
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(1) The definition provided in the INCOSE Handbook is built on the language in ISO/IEC 15288:2015. Consequently it is at a high level of abstraction.
  
Definition (1) comes from ISO/IEC/IEEE 24748 - 4 (past IEEE 1220, ISO/IEC 26702) as functional architecture; but modified because in the standard functional and behavioral aspects are mixed. In reality the functional architecture emphasizes more on transformations performed rather than the sequencing of their executions. See definition of [[Functional Architecture (glossary) |functional architecture (glossary)]].
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(2) The definition in "Visualizing Project Management" is tied to the project cycle and the project management issues related to it. The intent is to bring the systems engineering activities into the project context.
  
Definition (2) is a good suggestion to represent a behavioral architecture, because a scenario of functions chains the execution of functions taking into account synchronization between functions and arrival of triggers.
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[[Category:Glossary of Terms]]
  
[[Category:Glossary of Terms]]
 
 
<center>'''SEBoK v. 2.1, released 31 October 2019'''</center>
 
<center>'''SEBoK v. 2.1, released 31 October 2019'''</center>

Latest revision as of 20:42, 19 October 2019

(1) A decision gate is an approval event (often associated with a review meeting). Entry and Exit criteria are established for each decision gate; continuation beyond the decision gate is contingent on the agreement of the decision-makers. (INCOSE 2011 p 362)

(2) A preplanned management event in the project cycle to demonstrate accomplishments, approve and baseline results, and approve the approach for continuing the project. (Also known as a control gate.) (Forsberg 2005, p 428)

Sources

(1) INCOSE. 2011. Systems Engineering Handbook, version 3.2.2. INCOSE-TP-2003-002-03.2.2.

(2) Forsberg, K., H. Mooz, H. Cotterman. 2005. Visualizing Project Management, 3rd Ed., Hoboken, NJ, USA: John Wiley and Sons.

Discussion

(1) The definition provided in the INCOSE Handbook is built on the language in ISO/IEC 15288:2015. Consequently it is at a high level of abstraction.

(2) The definition in "Visualizing Project Management" is tied to the project cycle and the project management issues related to it. The intent is to bring the systems engineering activities into the project context.

SEBoK v. 2.1, released 31 October 2019