Difference between pages "Capability Engineering" and "Letter from the Editor"

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{{Term|Capability (glossary)|Capability}} is increasingly being used to describe the Systems Engineering of Operational Capabilities. The INCOSE UK Capability System Engineering Guide (Kemp and Daw) built on this analysis and describes:
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[[File:Rob_Sm for Web.jpg|[[User:Rcloutier]]|right|150px]]
  
* That Capabilities are realised through a combination of people, processes, information as well as equipment;
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Hi there! Welcome to the June 2019 instantiation of the Systems Engineering Body of Knowledge. Initiated in 2009, and version 1.0 appeared in September 2012. Today we are officially launching version 2.0 of the SEBoK. There are some significant changes implemented in this version in terms of the MedaiWiki software and the capabilities available that are enabled.
* They are concerned with delivering outcomes, rather than outputs;
 
* They are enduring, with capabilities being upgraded rather than replaced;The term emerged in defence in the early 2000, however the concepts go back far earlier (Checkland, 1997).
 
* The concepts of Capability Systems Engineering have been used in Rail (Dogan, 2012) and Healthcare (Royal Academy of Engineering, 2017).  
 
is widely used across many industrial sectors and has begun to take on various specific meanings across, and even within, those sectors. Terms such as capability-based acquisition, capability engineering and management, life capability management, capability sponsor, etc. are now ubiquitous in defense and elsewhere. Henshaw et al. (2011) have identified at least eight worldviews of capability and capability engineering and concluded that the task of capability engineering is not consistently defined across the different communities.
 
  
The aim of capability systems engineering is to ensure that the upgraded capability meets stakeholders needs. Good Capability Systems Engineering provides a clear line of sight from the purpose of the capability, through the operational concept and whole system design down to specific requirements and interfaces (Figure 1)
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Version 2.0 is the first time we are making use of the multimedia capabilities of the underlying MediaWiki platform. In a few places, you will find audio or video recordings to enhance the user experience. We have also implemented Glossary Bubbles. In the past, if you clicked on a word or term that appeared in the glossary, you were sent to that glossary page. You would then navigate back to the originating page. In Version 2.0, a Glossary Bubble opens with the glossary information, allowing you to remain on the originating page.
  
[Add Figure]
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In the short 7.5 years the SEBoK has existed, it has received over 1,600,000 visits, with over 3,200,00 page views. Average visits per month for 2019 is running around 35,000, with approximately 80,000 page views per month. The five most popular pages for the first 3 months of 2019 were:
 +
# Types of Systems (15,119)
 +
# Stakeholder Needs and Requirements (12,738)
 +
# System Requirements (9,923)
 +
# Types of Models (9,597)
 +
# Reliability, Availability, and Maintainability (8,401)
 +
Another new feature we are introducing in this Version 2.0 rollout is attribution. The initial SEBoK was a community project, and an intentional decision was made to not attribute the authors of any single page. Times change. While the SEBoK is not a traditional peer-reviewed media, new articles are reviewed by the Section Editor, the Managing Editor, and the Editor in Chief before publishing. If any of those individuals need an outside opinion, other experts may be asked to review and edit the new article. So, effective in Version 2.0, if a new article is submitted by 1-3 authors, and the content has only recieved minor edits (not a major rewrite by an editor), the authors names will appear at the bottom of the article. It is the intent to also go back through the existing articles and if any warrant the same attribution, this will be done for the next version (V 2.1). The goal of this change is to increase the stable content of the SEBoK by attracting new authors.
  
Capability engineering is concerned with the whole lifecycle (Figure 2); the “Fuzzy front end” of capability trade-offs, the conventional ‘V’ product lifecycle, and the “Messy in-service” support phase.
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Version 2.0 has the following updates:
 +
# Glossary Bubbles
 +
# Major article attribution in the form of by-lines in the footer of an article
 +
# Some multimedia content, which will be continued moving forward
 +
# An improved Menu-tree structure
 +
# Part 2 updates
 +
# Part 3 updates
 +
# Part 5 Updates
 +
# Updated definitions for System, Engineered System, and Systems Engineering to be consistent with the INCOSE BoD adopted definitions from the INCOSE Fellows
 +
# References to the INCOSE Competency Model
 +
# General cleanup
 +
Where are we headed? Good question. We would like to add some new editors to the editorial board. Some of the founders are beginning to move on, and we are looking for fresh participants. As already mentioned, we are looking for new content and authors. We are looking for original multimedia. If you have recorded, or would like to record some items for the SEBoK, please reach out to Nicole Hutchinson or myself and we will help you. Finally, we see more systems engineering applied across engineering disciplines. We would like to have some articles addressing that aspect of systems engineering.
  
[Add figure]
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That is it for now ... I hope to see you at the International Symposium in Orlando. If you have ideas for the SEBoK, or would like to get involved, be sure to find me there and we can have some coffee and chat. Thanks for your ongoing support.
  
Capability Systems Engineering uses standard SE tools, applied from the perspective of the asset owner-operators (i.e. the military user or rail transportation provider).
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[[File:RobSignature2.jpeg|440x440px|left]]
 
 
Kemp and Daw (2014) note several differences between Capability Systems Engineering and the more traditional product Systems Engineering:
 
* Using persuasion and influence as much as command and control to implement decisions
 
* Building in flexibility where possible, as the capability will change.
 
* Implementing the transition to the improved capability as both an engineering and cultural change.
 
* Recognising that capabilities are often Complex Adaptive Systems. As the capability improves, users or competitors change their behaviour, reducing the effectiveness of the capability
 
* Capability trade-offs are not about simple comparisons, between similar things – often they are choices between new equipment, better training or new processes.
 
There is a strong relationship between Capability Engineering and system of systems (SoS).. To some a Capability is a type of system/SoS, to others it is what the system/SoS does. This is explored in Henshaw et al. (2011), who describe at least eight worldviews of capability and capability engineering
 
 
 
==Services View of SoSE==
 
 
 
As it has been discussed throughout the [[Systems of Systems (SoS)]] knowledge area, a ‘system of systems’ is typically approached from the viewpoint of bringing together multiple systems to provide broader capability. As is discussed in [[Architecting Approaches for Systems of Systems]], the networking of the constituent systems in a SoS is often a key part of an SoS. In some circumstances, the entire content of a SoS is information and the SoS brings together multiple information systems to support the information needs of a broader community. These ‘{{Term|Information Technology (glossary)|information technology}}
 
 
 
{{Term|Information Technology (glossary)|information technology}}
 
 
 
{{Term|Information Technology (glossary)|information technology}}
 
 
 
{{Term|Information Technology (glossary)|information technology}} (IT)-based’ SoSs have the same set of characteristics of other SoSs and face many of the same challenges. Currently, IT has adopted a ‘services’ view of this type of SoS and increasingly applies a International Organization for Standaradization (ISO) 20000 series (Information technology -- Service management) or Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) v. 3 (OGC 2009) based approach to the design and management of information-based SoS. 
 
A service perspective simplifies SoSE as it:
 
 
 
* is a more natural way for users to interact with and understand a SoS,
 
* allows designers to design specific services to meet defined performance and effectiveness targets, and
 
* enables specific service levels to be tested and monitored through life.
 
 
 
Although it has not been proven to be universally applicable, the services view works well in both IT and transportation SoS.
 
 
 
==References==
 
 
 
===Works Cited===
 
 
 
Henshaw, M., D. Kemp, P. Lister, A. Daw, A. Harding, A. Farncombe, and M. Touchin. 2011. "Capability Engineering - An Analysis of Perspectives." Presented at International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) 21st International Symposium, June 20-23, 2011, Denver, CO, USA.
 
 
 
Checkland P. and Holwell, S, 1997, Information, Systems and Information Systems: Making Sense of the Field
 
 
 
Dogan, H., Henshaw, M. and Johnson, J., 2012. An incremental hybridisation of heterogeneous case studies to develop an ontology for Capability Engineering. In: INCOSE, ed. The 22nd Annual INCOSE International Symposium 9-12 July 2012 Rome, Italy.
 
 
 
Royal Academy of Engineering, 2017, Engineering better care a systems approach to health and care design and continuous improvement
 
 
 
Erl, T. 2008. ''SOA Principles of Service Design.'' Boston, MA, USA: Prentice Hall Pearson Education.
 
 
 
Hitchins, D.K. 2003. ''Advanced Systems Thinking, Engineering and Management''. Norwood, MA, USA: Artech House, Inc.
 
 
 
OGC (Office of Government Commerce). 2009. ''[[ITIL Lifecycle Publication Suite Books]].'' London, UK: The Stationery Office.
 
 
 
===Primary References===
 
Henshaw, M., D. Kemp, P. Lister, A. Daw, A. Harding, A. Farncombe, and M. Touchin. 2011. "[[Capability Engineering - An Analysis of Perspectives]]." Presented at International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) 21st International Symposium, June 20-23, 2011, Denver, CO, USA.
 
 
 
Kemp D., Daw A. 2014, INCOSE UK Capability Systems Engineering Guide
 
 
 
===Additional References===
 
Davies, J.K. 2011. ''Survey of Background Literature for Capability Engineering''. INCOSE UK Capability Working Group Report.
 
 
 
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<center>[[Socio-Technical Features of Systems of Systems|< Previous Article]] | [[Systems of Systems (SoS)|Parent Article]] | [[Healthcare Systems Engineering|Next Article >]]</center>
 
 
 
<center>'''SEBoK v. 2.0, released 1 June 2019'''</center>
 
 
 
[[Category:Part 4]]
 
[[Category:Topic]]
 
[[Category:Systems of Systems (SoS)]]
 

Revision as of 11:06, 16 October 2019

User:Rcloutier

Hi there! Welcome to the June 2019 instantiation of the Systems Engineering Body of Knowledge. Initiated in 2009, and version 1.0 appeared in September 2012. Today we are officially launching version 2.0 of the SEBoK. There are some significant changes implemented in this version in terms of the MedaiWiki software and the capabilities available that are enabled.

Version 2.0 is the first time we are making use of the multimedia capabilities of the underlying MediaWiki platform. In a few places, you will find audio or video recordings to enhance the user experience. We have also implemented Glossary Bubbles. In the past, if you clicked on a word or term that appeared in the glossary, you were sent to that glossary page. You would then navigate back to the originating page. In Version 2.0, a Glossary Bubble opens with the glossary information, allowing you to remain on the originating page.

In the short 7.5 years the SEBoK has existed, it has received over 1,600,000 visits, with over 3,200,00 page views. Average visits per month for 2019 is running around 35,000, with approximately 80,000 page views per month. The five most popular pages for the first 3 months of 2019 were:

  1. Types of Systems (15,119)
  2. Stakeholder Needs and Requirements (12,738)
  3. System Requirements (9,923)
  4. Types of Models (9,597)
  5. Reliability, Availability, and Maintainability (8,401)

Another new feature we are introducing in this Version 2.0 rollout is attribution. The initial SEBoK was a community project, and an intentional decision was made to not attribute the authors of any single page. Times change. While the SEBoK is not a traditional peer-reviewed media, new articles are reviewed by the Section Editor, the Managing Editor, and the Editor in Chief before publishing. If any of those individuals need an outside opinion, other experts may be asked to review and edit the new article. So, effective in Version 2.0, if a new article is submitted by 1-3 authors, and the content has only recieved minor edits (not a major rewrite by an editor), the authors names will appear at the bottom of the article. It is the intent to also go back through the existing articles and if any warrant the same attribution, this will be done for the next version (V 2.1). The goal of this change is to increase the stable content of the SEBoK by attracting new authors.

Version 2.0 has the following updates:

  1. Glossary Bubbles
  2. Major article attribution in the form of by-lines in the footer of an article
  3. Some multimedia content, which will be continued moving forward
  4. An improved Menu-tree structure
  5. Part 2 updates
  6. Part 3 updates
  7. Part 5 Updates
  8. Updated definitions for System, Engineered System, and Systems Engineering to be consistent with the INCOSE BoD adopted definitions from the INCOSE Fellows
  9. References to the INCOSE Competency Model
  10. General cleanup

Where are we headed? Good question. We would like to add some new editors to the editorial board. Some of the founders are beginning to move on, and we are looking for fresh participants. As already mentioned, we are looking for new content and authors. We are looking for original multimedia. If you have recorded, or would like to record some items for the SEBoK, please reach out to Nicole Hutchinson or myself and we will help you. Finally, we see more systems engineering applied across engineering disciplines. We would like to have some articles addressing that aspect of systems engineering.

That is it for now ... I hope to see you at the International Symposium in Orlando. If you have ideas for the SEBoK, or would like to get involved, be sure to find me there and we can have some coffee and chat. Thanks for your ongoing support.

RobSignature2.jpeg