Difference between pages "Knowledge (glossary)" and "Planning"

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This knowledge area is about managing the resources and assets allocated to perform {{Term|Systems Engineering (glossary)|systems engineering}}, often in the context of a {{Term|Project (glossary)|project}} or a {{Term|Service (glossary)|service}}, but sometimes in the context of a less well-defined activity. {{Term|Systems Engineering Management (SEM) (glossary)|Systems engineering management}} is distinguished from general {{Term|Project Management (glossary)|project management}} by its focus on the technical or engineering aspects of a project. SEM also encompasses exploratory research and development (R&D) activities at the {{Term|Enterprise (glossary)|enterprise}} level in commercial or government operations.
  
# ''acquaintance with facts, truths, or principles, as from study or investigation; general erudition: knowledge of many things.
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==Topics==
# ''acquaintance or familiarity gained by sight, experience, or report: a knowledge of human nature.
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Each part of the SEBoK is composed of knowledge areas (KAs). Each KA groups topics together around a theme related to the overall subject of the part.
# ''the fact or state of knowing;  the perception of fact or truth; clear and certain mental apprehension.
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This KA contains the following topics:  
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*[[Planning]]
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*[[Assessment and Control]]
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*[[Risk Management]]
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*[[Measurement]]
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*[[Decision Management]]
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*[[Configuration Management]]
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*[[Information Management]]
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*[[Quality Management]]
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See the article [[Matrix of Implementation Examples]] for a mapping of case studies and vignettes included in Part 7 to topics covered in Part 3.
  
==Source==
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==Discussion==
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Implementing {{Term|Systems Engineering (glossary)|systems engineering}} (SE) requires the coordination of technical and managerial endeavors.  Success with the technical is not possible in the absence of the managerial. Management provides the planning, organizational structure, collaborative environment, and program controls to ensure that {{Term|Stakeholder (glossary)|stakeholder}} needs are met. 
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The Venn diagram below provides some context for thinking about SEM. It shows that some functions are managed within the SE function, while others are managed in collaboration with the management of {{Term|Implementation (glossary)|systems implementation}} and with overall {{Term|Project Management (glossary)|project}} and systems management.
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[[File:Scope_BoundariesSE_PM_SM.png|thumb|600px|center|'''Figure 1. Systems Engineering Management Boundaries.''' (SEBoK Original)]]
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There is no one-size-fits-all way to define the details of where SEM functions are performed. An in-company SE organization does not run its own accounting system, but relies on the corporate management organization for this aspect of SEM.  A company performing only SE ''does'' include the accounting functions as part of SEM. In all cases, the managers of the SE function must be actively involved in the management of all the activities within the SE system boundary, including working out what collaborative arrangements best fit their situation. They must also remain aware of management events in their {{Term|Environment (glossary)|environment}} outside the system boundary that may affect their ability to perform. Part 6 of the SEBoK includes relevant knowledge areas for collaborative management, including [[Systems Engineering and Software Engineering]], [[Systems Engineering and Project Management]], [[Systems Engineering and Industrial Engineering]], [[Procurement and Acquisition|Systems Engineering and Procurement/Acquisition]], and [[Systems Engineering and Specialty Engineering]].
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==References==
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===Works Cited===
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None.
  
Dictionary.com. 2012 "Knowledge."  Available at [http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/knowledge http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/knowledge].
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===Primary References===
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Blanchard, B.S. 2004. ''[[Systems Engineering Management (reference)|Systems Engineering Management]],'' 3rd ed. New York, NY, USA: John Wiley & Sons Inc.
  
==Discussion==
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Sage, A.P. and W. Rouse. 2009. ''[[Handbook of Systems Engineering and Management]],'' 2nd Ed.  Hoboken, NJ, USA: John Wiley and Sons.
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===Additional References===
 
None.
 
None.
  
[[Category:Glossary of Terms]]
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<center>[[Logistics|< Previous Article]] |  [[Systems Engineering and Management|Parent Article]]  |  [[Planning|Next Article >]]</center>
  
 
<center>'''SEBoK v. 2.0, released 1 June 2019'''</center>
 
<center>'''SEBoK v. 2.0, released 1 June 2019'''</center>
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[[Category: Part 3]][[Category:Knowledge Area]]

Revision as of 20:48, 19 October 2019

This knowledge area is about managing the resources and assets allocated to perform systems engineeringsystems engineering, often in the context of a projectproject or a serviceservice, but sometimes in the context of a less well-defined activity. Systems engineering managementSystems engineering management is distinguished from general project managementproject management by its focus on the technical or engineering aspects of a project. SEM also encompasses exploratory research and development (R&D) activities at the enterpriseenterprise level in commercial or government operations.

Topics

Each part of the SEBoK is composed of knowledge areas (KAs). Each KA groups topics together around a theme related to the overall subject of the part. This KA contains the following topics:

See the article Matrix of Implementation Examples for a mapping of case studies and vignettes included in Part 7 to topics covered in Part 3.

Discussion

Implementing systems engineeringsystems engineering (SE) requires the coordination of technical and managerial endeavors. Success with the technical is not possible in the absence of the managerial. Management provides the planning, organizational structure, collaborative environment, and program controls to ensure that stakeholderstakeholder needs are met.

The Venn diagram below provides some context for thinking about SEM. It shows that some functions are managed within the SE function, while others are managed in collaboration with the management of systems implementationsystems implementation and with overall projectproject and systems management.

Figure 1. Systems Engineering Management Boundaries. (SEBoK Original)

There is no one-size-fits-all way to define the details of where SEM functions are performed. An in-company SE organization does not run its own accounting system, but relies on the corporate management organization for this aspect of SEM. A company performing only SE does include the accounting functions as part of SEM. In all cases, the managers of the SE function must be actively involved in the management of all the activities within the SE system boundary, including working out what collaborative arrangements best fit their situation. They must also remain aware of management events in their environmentenvironment outside the system boundary that may affect their ability to perform. Part 6 of the SEBoK includes relevant knowledge areas for collaborative management, including Systems Engineering and Software Engineering, Systems Engineering and Project Management, Systems Engineering and Industrial Engineering, Systems Engineering and Procurement/Acquisition, and Systems Engineering and Specialty Engineering.

References

Works Cited

None.

Primary References

Blanchard, B.S. 2004. Systems Engineering Management, 3rd ed. New York, NY, USA: John Wiley & Sons Inc.

Sage, A.P. and W. Rouse. 2009. Handbook of Systems Engineering and Management, 2nd Ed. Hoboken, NJ, USA: John Wiley and Sons.

Additional References

None.


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